The Science of Time

Hey, I'm Harry. Just another highschool student with a science obssession and a blog. Chemistry, Physics and maths are my mains and with them I hope to study electrical and electronics engineering at the University of Adelaide (did I mention I am Australian!). So yeah feel free to message me anytime if you are curious or just need a friend. Disclosure: I am a highschool student not a PhD
heck-yeah-old-tech:

60s70sand80s:

Texas Instruments ad, 1983

C’mon, the Intel 8086 and 80286 machines were not spectacular but they were expandable and not cartridge-based.Ironically, the above review was not how the computer industry — including Popular Computing magazine and the manufacturer of this very machine — felt weeks later.  By some strange twist, the Texas Instruments ‘TI-99/4A’ was discontinued in October of 1983, right after that review came out yet right before this ad went to press.

heck-yeah-old-tech:

60s70sand80s:

Texas Instruments ad, 1983

C’mon, the Intel 8086 and 80286 machines were not spectacular but they were expandable and not cartridge-based.
Ironically, the above review was not how the computer industry — including Popular Computing magazine and the manufacturer of this very machine — felt weeks later. By some strange twist, the Texas Instruments ‘TI-99/4A was discontinued in October of 1983, right after that review came out yet right before this ad went to press.

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 7/28/14 - NGC 3293

Meet NGC 3293, small cluster of stars in the Carina constellation. Here, we can see that the young stars are enshrouded by an immensely large cloud of ionized, gaseous material. The chain reaction that sparked this brilliant glow began about 10 million years ago, when the region was merely a large gas cloud, with bits of dust and some older stars scattered about. Eventually, sections of the cloud collapsed and birthed new stars, which returned the favor by providing the ultraviolet radiation needed to knock atoms of their electrons. Once they found their way back to each other, the glow made its appearance.

Not all of the 50-some stars were born at the same time though. Nor will they die at the same time either, as many of the stars are hot, massive blue-white stars, while some of them are reddish and a bit more elderly. Astronomers have a hunch that some other unknown mechanism driving the population of stars is still at work, but we’ve yet to discover just what that mechanism is and how it functions.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/X2FuSk

Image Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 7/28/14 - NGC 3293

Meet NGC 3293, small cluster of stars in the Carina constellation. Here, we can see that the young stars are enshrouded by an immensely large cloud of ionized, gaseous material. The chain reaction that sparked this brilliant glow began about 10 million years ago, when the region was merely a large gas cloud, with bits of dust and some older stars scattered about. Eventually, sections of the cloud collapsed and birthed new stars, which returned the favor by providing the ultraviolet radiation needed to knock atoms of their electrons. Once they found their way back to each other, the glow made its appearance.

Not all of the 50-some stars were born at the same time though. Nor will they die at the same time either, as many of the stars are hot, massive blue-white stars, while some of them are reddish and a bit more elderly. Astronomers have a hunch that some other unknown mechanism driving the population of stars is still at work, but we’ve yet to discover just what that mechanism is and how it functions.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/X2FuSk

Image Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

astronomyforamateurs:

The Eskimo Nebula, named for the fact that it appears as a person’s head surrounded by a parka hood, was discovered by famed astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago in 1787. However, the technology of the past could not reveal the complexity of the inner structure of the nebula, which still leaves modern day astronomers with much to learn on the formation of planetary nebulae.Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/IAA-CSIC/N. Ruiz et al.; Optical: NASA/STScIWant more astronomy? Check out AstronomyForAmateurs.com

astronomyforamateurs:

The Eskimo Nebula, named for the fact that it appears as a person’s head surrounded by a parka hood, was discovered by famed astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago in 1787. However, the technology of the past could not reveal the complexity of the inner structure of the nebula, which still leaves modern day astronomers with much to learn on the formation of planetary nebulae.

Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/IAA-CSIC/N. Ruiz et al.Optical: NASA/STScI

Want more astronomy? Check out AstronomyForAmateurs.com

exemplaryetoile:

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

THIS IS WHAT A WORLD LEADER LOOKS LIKE.  
DESMOND TUTU, I OFFICIALLY LOVE YOU.
      -MICHAEL STIPE  

"I would refuse to go to a homophobic heaven. No, I would say sorry, I mean I would much rather go to the other place," Archbishop Tutu said at the launch of the Free and Equal campaign in Cape Town.
"I would not worship a God who is homophobic and that is how deeply I feel about this."
Archbishop Tutu said the campaign against homophobia was similar to the campaign waged against racism in South Africa.
"I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about apartheid. For me, it is at the same level," he added.
[source: BBC News]

exemplaryetoile:

confessionsofamichaelstipe:

THIS IS WHAT A WORLD LEADER LOOKS LIKE.  

DESMOND TUTU, I OFFICIALLY LOVE YOU.

      -MICHAEL STIPE  

"I would refuse to go to a homophobic heaven. No, I would say sorry, I mean I would much rather go to the other place," Archbishop Tutu said at the launch of the Free and Equal campaign in Cape Town.

"I would not worship a God who is homophobic and that is how deeply I feel about this."

Archbishop Tutu said the campaign against homophobia was similar to the campaign waged against racism in South Africa.

"I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about apartheid. For me, it is at the same level," he added.

[source: BBC News]

(via cas-got-your-tongue)

spaceexp:

The hexagon on Saturn’s north pole

spaceexp:

The hexagon on Saturn’s north pole


Pictured from a window on the International Space Station, the aft section of the docked space shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the station.
(link)

Pictured from a window on the International Space Station, the aft section of the docked space shuttle Atlantis (STS-132) is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the station.

(link)

(Source: fuckyeahspaceshuttle, via the-actual-universe)