The Science of Time

Hey, I'm Harry. Just another highschool student with a science obssession and a blog. Chemistry, Physics and maths are my mains and with them I hope to study electrical and electronics engineering at the University of Adelaide (did I mention I am Australian!). So yeah feel free to message me anytime if you are curious or just need a friend. Disclosure: I am a highschool student not a PhD
underthescopemin:

Cadminm Smithsonite
Cadmium enriched Smithsonite of acute rhombic crystals. It probably only takes a very small percentage of Cadmium to give the beautiful yellow colour. They are wonderfully gemmy and translucent light yellow. The crystal cluster sits on a thin bubbly covering of sparkling translucent greyish Smithsonite, on matrix of varied red-brown coloured Fe-oxides and futher deposits of Smithsonite. 

underthescopemin:

Cadminm Smithsonite

Cadmium enriched Smithsonite of acute rhombic crystals. It probably only takes a very small percentage of Cadmium to give the beautiful yellow colour. They are wonderfully gemmy and translucent light yellow. The crystal cluster sits on a thin bubbly covering of sparkling translucent greyish Smithsonite, on matrix of varied red-brown coloured Fe-oxides and futher deposits of Smithsonite. 

(via starstuffblog)

childrenofthisplanet:

Billions of years from now, only one of these two galaxies will remain. Until then, spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163 will slowly pull each other apart, creating tides of matter, sheets of shocked gas, lanes of dark dust, bursts of star formation, and streams of cast-away stars. Astronomers predict that NGC 2207, the larger galaxy on the left, will eventually incorporate IC 2163, the smaller galaxy on the right. In the most recent encounter that about peaked 40 million years ago, the smaller galaxy is swinging around counter-clockwise, and is now slightly behind the larger galaxy. The space between stars is so vast that when galaxies collide, the stars in them usually do not collide.
Credit: NASA

childrenofthisplanet:

Billions of years from now, only one of these two galaxies will remain. Until then, spiral galaxies NGC 2207 and IC 2163 will slowly pull each other apart, creating tides of matter, sheets of shocked gas, lanes of dark dust, bursts of star formation, and streams of cast-away stars. Astronomers predict that NGC 2207, the larger galaxy on the left, will eventually incorporate IC 2163, the smaller galaxy on the right. In the most recent encounter that about peaked 40 million years ago, the smaller galaxy is swinging around counter-clockwise, and is now slightly behind the larger galaxy. The space between stars is so vast that when galaxies collide, the stars in them usually do not collide.

Credit: NASA

(via starstuffblog)

vacilandoelmundo:

“So you’re made of detritus [from exploded stars]. Get over it. Or better yet, celebrate it. After all, what nobler thought can one cherish than that the universe lives within us all?”

―Neil deGrasse Tyson

These photos are on the shortlist for Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2014, a competition and exhibition run by the Royal Observatory Greenwich. The winning images will be posted here on September 18.

(Source: fastcodesign.com, via starstuffblog)